Welcome
About
Services
Did you Know?
FAQ
Jobs
Contact Us
e-mail me

Frequently Asked Questions

What is cellulose insulation?

Cellulose insulation is environmentally friendly. Our insulation is produced by AFT. AFT's cellulose insulation uses 100% recycled wastepaper fibers to- • Reduce landfill space requirements and conserves trees • Save energy used by the building/home owner • Use less energy to produce than equivalent fiberglass insulation A typical 1,500 square-foot ranch-style home that is insulated with cellulose recycles as much newsprint as an individual will consume in 40 years. In 2004 alone, over 650,000 tons of wastepaper - which is equivalent to over 10 million trees - were recycled into this superior insulating product. Our insulation also contains no asbestos, formaldehyde or fiberglass.

Back to Top


What is fiberglass insulation?

Fiberglass is made from silica sand, which is heated to high temperatures to produce glass and then spun into micro-thin fibers. It is usually formed into either blankets (batts or rolls) or loose-fill. Batts are available in kraft-faced or unfaced varieties. Please talk to your estimator to determine where vapor-barrier should be used.

Back to Top


Why should I consider using cellulose insulation instead of fiberglass insulation?

Cellulose insulation is denser than fiberglass and when installed, conforms to the space where it is installed. This creates a thermal and acoustical blanket. Where as fiber glass uses a high quantity of natural resources to produce, Cellulose is a recycled product, requiring very little natural resources to. What are the benefits? • Air and sound infiltration is minimized • Comfort and energy savings are increased • Negative impact to the environment is reduced • Cost savings is passed on to the customer

Back to Top


What is the performance difference between cellulose and fiberglass?

Several factors contribute to the performance of the thermal envelope of a building, thus it is a mistake to only consider the R-value when specifying insulation. The factors: • Total R-value of all system components • Air infiltration due to leakage through gaps in the system • Air infiltration due to permeability of system materials • Convective flow within insulated systems • Thermal bridging across the building envelope • Thermal mass of building components Since cellulose insulation has a higher density than loose fill fiberglass and fiberglass batts, the air infiltration into and within the cellulose insulation is less than in its fiberglass counterpart. The fact that cellulose insulation is sprayed into wall cavities instead of cut and placed by hand, means tighter seamless barriers are created in every area of the wall cavity, including small cracks and crevices. When a such a barrier is created with cellulose insulation your building is 38% tighter and uses 26% less energy than a building insulated with fiberglass. These results are based upon a two-month study by the University of Colorado at Denver School of Architecture and Planning.

Back to Top


Will Cellulose Insulation Lower my Heating Cost?

Yes. By using cellulose insulation, we are able to create a tighter building envelope than can be done with fiberglass insulation.This means your maintenance and operating costs on heating and cooling systems will be reduced because a more consistent room-to-room temperature is created. In some cases, you will even be able to downsize your heating and cooling systems by using cellulose insulation.

Back to Top


Doesn't paper burn?

Untreated paper does burn, however the cellulose insulation that we use, is manufactured with additives that prevent it from becoming an ignition source. cellulose insulation has been tested and exceeds all government standards for use in residential and commersial structures. AFT insulation is rated as a Class 1 building material when tested in accordance with ASTM E84. The fire retardants inhibit the spread of fire while fiberglass and foam melt under the same conditions and creates open spaces for flame and smoke to travel.

Back to Top


Will Cellulose mold?

Mold spores are all around us including on our bodies, in the air, and in the soil. Mold spores are dormant and require adequate food, air, moisture and temperature to grow. Because mold spores can travel in the air, there is no practical way to prevent them from entering buildings. Excessive levels of moisture will increase the likelihood of mold growth. The most common sources of excessive moisture are exterior leaks and high interior relative humidity from bathrooms, kitchens, humidifiers, etc. The following websites contains common sense articles in dealing with the prevention of mold: www.buildingscience.com/resources/mold/default.htm and www.moldtips.com

Back to Top


My house is all ready insulated with fiberglass, can I upgrade to Cellulose?

We call this a retrofit and it really depends on the existing structure. In most cases a retrofit of the attic is available. Walls need to be inspected by one of our insulation experts to determine if it is possible. We offer any of our inspections and quotes for FREE. Call 440-355-5448 to schedule a FREE inspection of your home or commercial building.

Back to Top


Does cellulose insulation require a vapor barrier?

Our supplier, AFT does not recommend the use of vapor barriers when used with cellulose insulation except in high concentrated moisture areas, such as spas, restaurants, pool buildings, etc. For more information on vapor barriers, please visit AFT's website at advancedfiber.com

Back to Top


What does insulation actually do for my home?

Cellulose insulation keeps your home cool in the summer and warm in the winter, because insulation resists the flow of heat. Heat is a form of energy and always seeks a cooler area - flowing out of the home in the winter and into the home in the summer. By reducing heat flow, a properly insulated home uses less energy for heating and cooling. In addition to being an energy saver, Cellulose insulation also acts as a sound absorber. When installed in walls and ceilings, it can reduce the transmission of sound from one room to another or from the outside. In today's noise-laden environments, more and more homeowners are soundproofing their homes. A well-insulated home increases the overall comfort of the home and adds to its resale value. Whether your home is new or old, it pays to insulate.

Back to Top


What areas of my home should be insulated?

Insulation is not just for attics and outside walls. Insulation should also be installed in other areas of your home such as ceilings with unheated spaces, basement walls, floors above vented crawl spaces, cathedral ceilings, floors over unheated garages or porches, knee walls, and in between interior walls, ceilings or floors for extra sound control.

Back to Top


My house is very noisy. Is there anything that can be done to decrease the noise?

Insulating for sound control is best completed during the building process before drywall is installed. Sound control is achieved when fiberglass batt or cellulose insulation is installed in interior walls of the home. When sound waves pass through a sound-insulated wall, ceiling or floor, the energized air molecules bump into the insulation and pass some of their energy into the. Thus, when the sound wave reaches the other side of the wall, ceiling or floor, it has much less energy, and the sound has much less volume. The result is a quieter room. Popular areas for sound control include bathrooms, bedrooms, media rooms, study/office areas, and between floors of the home.

Back to Top


What is R-value?

A material’s R-value is the measure of its resistance to heat flow. It is important to know the R-value because many states or regions require that a roof system have a minimum amount of thermal resistance on commercial, industrial, and/or residential buildings. The way it works is simple: the higher the R-value, the more the material insulates.

Back to Top


What are questions to ask about insulation?

Prior to building a home or buying a home, it is important to spend some time talking to the builder or seller about the home's energy efficiency and the insulation. These issues are equally important in planning the remodeling of an existing home. The three questions you need to ask are: What type of insulation is in the home, what areas of the home should be insulated, and does the insulation meet or exceed local building codes and national recommended insulation levels.

Back to Top